Neon Ants 2017-Part 3: Myles Standish State Forest, Massachusetts and Cedar Creek LTER, Minnesota

I haven been quite busy catching up on writing and reviewing manuscripts so this update will more or less be just a slide show of the last 2 sites that we visited before coming home to Oklahoma. Sites 5 and 6 of the Neon Ants 2017 project visited the beautiful Myles Standish State Forest inContinue reading “Neon Ants 2017-Part 3: Myles Standish State Forest, Massachusetts and Cedar Creek LTER, Minnesota”

Neon Ants 2017-Part 2: Virginia Coast Reserve LTER, Virginia and Harvard Forest LTER, Massachusetts

Sites 3 and 4 of the Neon Ants 2017 project visited two wonderful LTER sites on the east coast of the USA: Virginia Coast Reserve LTER, Virginia and the Harvard Forest LTER, Massachusetts. The LTER (Long Term Ecological Research: https://lternet.edu/) program covers 25 different ecosystems from Alaska to the Caribbean including deserts, estuaries, lakes, oceans,Continue reading “Neon Ants 2017-Part 2: Virginia Coast Reserve LTER, Virginia and Harvard Forest LTER, Massachusetts”

Neon Ants 2017-Part 1: Mark Twain National Forest, Missouri and Bankhead National Forest, Alabama

The 2017 leg of the Neon Ants project is officially underway! So far we have visited two sites: (1) Mark Twain National Forest, Missouri and (2) Bankhead National Forest, Alabama. Both forests were quite nice, albeit the humidity is always surprising in the south. Mark Twain National Forest Bankhead National Forest   Next post IContinue reading “Neon Ants 2017-Part 1: Mark Twain National Forest, Missouri and Bankhead National Forest, Alabama”

Citizen Science: A pilot test for the Ants of Oklahoma Project

Have you ever wondered how many different types of animals are right outside your door? Since the Oklahoma Biodiversity Forum in 2015, Dr. Diane Roeder and I have been brainstorming ideas for projects where we could highlight the wonderful biodiversity of our world to the next generation. As there has been a recent upsurge of interest in life aroundContinue reading “Citizen Science: A pilot test for the Ants of Oklahoma Project”

NEW PAPER OUT! The Pheidole (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) of Oklahoma: new species records and distributional notes

2017 is shaping up to be a nice year as our most recent paper on some new Pheidole species in Oklahoma was just published! Pheidole are a really fascinating and speciose genus that has a dimorphic workforce that is comprised of both minor and major workers. Fittingly, they are commonly called big-headed ants! In thisContinue reading “NEW PAPER OUT! The Pheidole (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) of Oklahoma: new species records and distributional notes”

The Ants of Oklahoma: a collaborative project

Knowing your study organism(s) is one of the most important things for an ecologist as it can lead to amazing insights and future ideas about how the natural world works. For me, those study organisms are the ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). With help from collaborators and friends, we have started to publish exciting, but relatively small,Continue reading “The Ants of Oklahoma: a collaborative project”

NEW PAPER OUT! A checklist and assemblage comparison of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) from the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma

I am excited to announce our first paper of 2016! This was a really fun project that we worked on in the latter half of 2015 with new county and state records for a number of ant species. We also found interesting differences in patterns of local diversity between habitat types. We hope to follow this work upContinue reading “NEW PAPER OUT! A checklist and assemblage comparison of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) from the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma”

Ant Ecology in New Mexico

New Mexico is a beautiful state. Despite its proximity to both Texas and Oklahoma, I really haven’t spent much time here. At the end of May, I was fortunate to join a team from the Kaspari lab who are resurveying ant transects that were initially measured 20 years ago. They are doing a lot of really cool,Continue reading “Ant Ecology in New Mexico”